Do you have questions?

Contact a Infancy to Innovation guide who can help you identify who to contact to establish a university-community partnership

Contact a guide now »

Intellectual & Social Development

Resources

This is a community-driven website. If you are aware of other resources to include on this page, please contact Michelle Nicholson (mnichols@inghamisd.org) for child related ones and Angela Waters Austin (aaustin@ingham.org) for youth and young adult related ones.

The following are data sources, readings, and other general resources related to intellectual and social development of young children, youth and young adults:

Young Children

Results of the Ingham GSC Strategic Planning process in the form of the Ingham Early Childhood Action Agenda

Reports and resources by the State Early Childhood Policy Technical Assistance Network on School Readiness.

Report to the Community on the Well-being of Ingham County's Young Children and their Families (2007)

Child Trends
Databank with more than 100 indicators of child and youth well-being and effective programs to enhance children's development. Child Trends is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research center that studies children at all stages of development.

Biweekly review of news, policy development and trends in the child and youth field.

Magnuson, K. A., Meyers, M. K., Ruhm, C. J.,  and Waldfogel, J. (2004). Inequality in Preschool Education and School Readiness. American Educational Research Journal, Vol. 41(1)(Spring, 2004), 115-157.

Youth

The Community Coalition for Youth website maintains data and reports on current and past projects related to youth in Ingham County

Child Trends
Databank with more than 100 indicators of child and youth well-being and effective programs to enhance children's development. Child Trends is a nonprofit, nonpartisan research center that studies children at all stages of development.

Biweekly review of news, policy development and trends in the child and youth field.

Finding out What Matters for Youth: Testing Key Links in a Community Action Framework for Youth Development. (2002). Michelle Gambone, Adena Klem, & James Connell, J. Philadelphia: Youth Development Strategies, Inc. and Institute for Research and Reform in Education.

Barnes, J., Almerigi, J. and Cousino, M. (2008). Promoting positive development in youth ages 10-15 in Genesee County (pp. 15). East Lansing, MI: University Outreach and Engagement, Michigan State University.

Kowaleski-Jones, L. (2000). Staying out of trouble: Community resources and problem behavior among high-risk adolescents. Journal of Marriage and Family, 62, 449-464.

Leventhal, T. & Brooks-Gunn, J. (2000). The neighborhoods they live in: The effects of neighborhood residence on child and adolescent outcomes. Psychological Bulletin, 126, 309–337.

Morenoff, J. D., Sampson, R. J., & Raudenbush S. W. (2001). Neighborhood inequality, collective efficacy, and the spatial dynamics of urban violence. Criminology, 39, 517-559.

Savin-Williams, R. C. & Berndt, T. J. (1990). Friendship and peer relations. In Feldman, S. S. & Elliot, G. R. (Eds.), At the threshold: The developing adolescent. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. 6 Amato, P., & Fowler, F. (2002). Parenting practices, child adjustment and family diversity. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 64, 703–716. 7 Lamborn, S., Mounts, N., Steinberg, L., & Dornbusch, S. (1991). Patterns of competence and adjustment among adolescents from authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, and neglectful homes. Child Development, 65, 1049–1065.

Young Adults

The Children of Immigrants Data Tool enables users to generate detailed charts of the characteristics of children age 0 to 17 nationwide and for individual states and the District of Columbia. It is a comprehensive interactive resource exploring the lives of 16.4 million children with foreign-born parents in the US.

Osgood, D. W., Foster, E. M., Flanagan, C. and Gretchen R. Ruth, G. R., (2004). Why Focus on The Transition to Adulthood for Vulnerable Populations? Pennsylvania; Research Network on Transitions to Adulthood and Public Policy.

Development and the next generation. (2007). Washington, D.C.: World Bank International Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Keith, J. (2008). Transitions to adulthood in the first decade of the 21st century: Focus 18 to 25 year olds. East Lansing, MI; University Outreach and Engagement, Michigan State University.

Growing up global: The changing transitions to adulthood in developing countries – Free executive summary. (2005). Cynthia B. Lloyd, (Ed.), Panel on Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries, National Research Council: National Academy of Sciences.